Lenoir City police officers and Align 9 volunteers spent Saturday morning outside Walmart for Drug Take Back Day.

 

Shoppers and community members handed off half-empty prescription drugs as an act of caution. Officers then dropped the containers into a bag filled with hundreds of other pill bottles, which would later be discarded. Read More

Lenoir City police officers and Align 9 volunteers spent Saturday morning outside Walmart for Drug Take Back Day.

Shoppers and community members handed off half-empty prescription drugs as an act of caution. Officers then dropped the containers into a bag filled with hundreds of other pill bottles, which would later be discarded. Read More

The local justice system is working with the faith-based community in Morgan County. One big advantage to Align9 working with the Morgan County Sheriff’s office is organization. Before involving Align9, when churches visited the Morgan County Jail there was no set schedule and several churches might show up at the same time. More

 

The local justice system is working with the faith-based community in Morgan County. One big advantage to Align9 working with the Morgan County Sheriff’s office is organization. Before involving Align9, when churches visited the Morgan County Jail there was no set schedule and several churches might show up at the same time. Read More

Staff members and participants in Judge Humpheys Roane County Drug Court wear bowties and pearls to commemorate National Awareness Day for NAS (Neonatel Abstinence Syndrome). Read more

Staff members and participants in Judge Humpheys Roane County Drug Court wear bowties and pearls to commemorate National Awareness Day for NAS (Neonatel Abstinence Syndrome). Read More

Align9  received funding from the Trinity Health Foundation to plan a rural transportation model to help increase access to care for individuals who need transportation from jail to rehabilitation facilities. Phase I funding will be used to research and plan details for project operations and sustainability. 

Align9  received funding from the Trinity Health Foundation to plan a rural transportation model to help increase access to care for individuals who need transportation from jail to rehabilitation facilities. Phase I funding will be used to research and plan details for project operations and sustainability. 

Align9, The Prevention Alliance of Loudon County, the Tellico Community Foundation, and community volunteers held a Drug Take Back Day at the Tellico Village Welcome Center. You can read more about the community effort here.

 

Align9, The Prevention Alliance of Loudon County, the Tellico Community Foundation, and community volunteers held a Drug Take Back Day at the Tellico Village Welcome Center. You can read more about the community effort here.

 

MLK Day of Service is intended to empower individuals, strengthen communities, bridge barriers, and create solutions to social problems. Align9 and the Corporation for National Community Service held the official launch for The Prevention Alliance of Loudon County.

The Prevention Alliance focuses on alcohol, tobacco and substance abuse. You can read more about this special day here.

MLK Day of Service is intended to empower individuals, strengthen communities, bridge barriers, and create solutions to social problems. Align9 and the Corporation for National Community Service held the official launch for The Prevention Alliance of Loudon County.

The Prevention Alliance focuses on alcohol, tobacco and substance abuse. You can read more about this special day here.

Align9 Has Built a Relationship with the Avalon Center and We Work Together in the Fight Against Domestic Violence

Morgan County Sheriff Wayne Potter spoke at the 4th Annual Take a Stand Against Domestic Violence event in Wartburg, Tennessee. He has invited the Avalon Center to the Sheriff’s Department to provide critical training which will assist officers in conducting thorough investigations when domestic abuse situations are reported. Sheriff Potter recognizes that education and training are essential. Wartburg is in Morgan County and is included in the 9th Judicial District.

Align9 Has Built a Relationship with the Avalon Center and We Work Together in the Fight Against Domestic Violence

Morgan County Sheriff Wayne Potter spoke at the 4th Annual Take a Stand Against Domestic Violence event in Wartburg, Tennessee. He has invited the Avalon Center to the Sheriff’s Department to provide critical training which will assist officers in conducting thorough investigations when domestic abuse situations are reported. Sheriff Potter recognizes that education and training are essential. Wartburg is in Morgan County and is included in the 9th Judicial District.

RECOVERY COURT GRADUATION

FALL 2017

Recovery court is “intensive supervision and treatment” that provides addicts an alternative to a jail cell and the opportunity to overcome their addiction. Recovery Court participants are held to a strict weekly schedule with check-ins, meetings and drug screenings. 

Roane County is at the epicenter of East Tennessee drug trafficking, and an opioid-addiction crisis that continues to claim lives and destroy families across the region.

Roane County officials say more alternatives to incarceration and drug treatment could help ease overcrowding in a system where nearly all jail inmates are locked up for drug-related crimes.

The purpose of the recovery court is to provide a one-year diversion program that offers non-violent drug offenders an opportunity to recover from addiction and return to a productive life.

Roane County is at the epicenter of East Tennessee drug trafficking, and an opioid-addiction crisis that continues to claim lives and destroy families across the region. Roane County officials say more alternatives to incarceration and drug treatment could help ease overcrowding in a system where nearly all jail inmates are locked up for drug-related crimes. In 2016, more Tennesseans died from a drug overdose than ever before in recorded state history. Many of the deaths were linked to opioids. The epidemic, “has led to the largest percentage of our criminal conduct. It’s filled up our jails. Put a price tag on that – I don’t know how you do it,” says District Attorney General Russell Johnson.

The Roane County Anti-Drug Coalition was formed as a result of the overwhelming number of deaths due to prescription drug overdose in Roane County.

In May 2015, District Attorney General Russell Johnson notified the members of the Roane County Commission of his intent to speak to them about the possibility of opening a “drug court” in Roane County.

The first Recovery Court was held in early 2016. The court was established after about two years of intensive planning and preparation but had been of deep interest for much longer. Efforts were directed to identifying gaps or duplications in services, instigating precursor programs, building relationships and partnerships and exploring funding opportunities. A Roane Recovery Court Steering Committee was formed. A federal grant application was submitted and approved.

The purpose of the recovery court is to provide a one-year diversion program that offers non-violent drug offenders an opportunity to recover from addiction and return to a productive life. Participants must apply for the program and go through a rigorous investigation.

Recovery court is “intensive supervision and treatment” that provides addicts an alternative to a jail cell and the opportunity to overcome their addiction. Recovery Court participants are held to a strict weekly schedule with check-ins, meetings and drug screenings.  Dennis Humphrey, general sessions court judge and recovery court judge, says they’ve found that more jail does not work. “It does not remedy the problem,” he says, “but something in the nature of a drug court does get to the heart of their problem, try to remedy that, try to work with them, to show them that we do care about what’s happening.” The alternative-sentencing program is part of a larger effort to save lives and create a healthier EastTennessee. As participants “phase up” to the next level, they are becoming different people.

Tennessee’s 9th Judicial District is comprised of Loudon, Meigs, Morgan, and Roane counties. A raging substance abuse problem, fueled by the opioid epidemic ravaging this district, and a lack of available means to obtain physical, mental, and behavioral resources has contributed to the economic depression of our District. There is a vast need for community awareness, education, support, and positive health and economic growth.

There is little doubt that the opioid epidemic ravaging our country hinders the 9th Judicial District’s attempts at economic development in our impoverished communities. Pain Pills, heroin, and now fentanyl have touched nearly every member of this community. This epidemic has left no stone unturned in impacting the 9th Judicial District.

It was out of this urgent necessity to address the economic and health devastation of the opioid epidemic and the current lack of available resources to do so that Align9 was founded. The primary purpose of align9 is to align resources for those in this community suffering from the effects of substance abuse disorder, lack of healthcare resources and education, and the economic and legal hurdles resulting from drug and alcohol addiction — bringing together government agencies, non-governmental agencies, and the faith based community.

Align9 develops teams of volunteers to serve as a solution to many of the problems and obstacles hindering both those attempting to overcome opioid addiction and the families and communities struggling to help.

A healthy sustained recovery from substance abuse disorder will allow these citizens and their families an opportunity to not only physically and mentally improve the status of their families and communities, but also economically recover from the poverty which substance use disorder perpetuates.

Roane County is at the epicenter of East Tennessee drug trafficking, and an opioid-addiction crisis that continues to claim lives and destroy families across the region. Roane County officials say more alternatives to incarceration and drug treatment could help ease overcrowding in a system where nearly all jail inmates are locked up for drug-related crimes. In 2016, more Tennesseans died from a drug overdose than ever before in recorded state history. Many of the deaths were linked to opioids. The epidemic, “has led to the largest percentage of our criminal conduct. It’s filled up our jails. Put a price tag on that – I don’t know how you do it,” says District Attorney General Russell Johnson.

The Roane County Anti-Drug Coalition was formed as a result of the overwhelming number of deaths due to prescription drug overdose in Roane County.

In May 2015, District Attorney General Russell Johnson notified the members of the Roane County Commission of his intent to speak to them about the possibility of opening a “drug court” in Roane County.

The first Recovery Court was held in early 2016. The court was established after about two years of intensive planning and preparation but had been of deep interest for much longer. Efforts were directed to identifying gaps or duplications in services, instigating precursor programs, building relationships and partnerships and exploring funding opportunities. A Roane Recovery Court Steering Committee was formed. A federal grant application was submitted and approved.

The purpose of the recovery court is to provide a one-year diversion program that offers non-violent drug offenders an opportunity to recover from addiction and return to a productive life. Participants must apply for the program and go through a rigorous investigation.

Recovery court is “intensive supervision and treatment” that provides addicts an alternative to a jail cell and the opportunity to overcome their addiction. Recovery Court participants are held to a strict weekly schedule with check-ins, meetings and drug screenings.  Dennis Humphrey, general sessions court judge and recovery court judge, says they’ve found that more jail does not work. “It does not remedy the problem,” he says, “but something in the nature of a drug court does get to the heart of their problem, try to remedy that, try to work with them, to show them that we do care about what’s happening.” The alternative-sentencing program is part of a larger effort to save lives and create a healthier EastTennessee. As participants “phase up” to the next level, they are becoming different people.

Tennessee’s 9th Judicial District is comprised of Loudon, Meigs, Morgan, and Roane counties. A raging substance abuse problem, fueled by the opioid epidemic ravaging this district, and a lack of available means to obtain physical, mental, and behavioral resources has contributed to the economic depression of our District. There is a vast need for community awareness, education, support, and positive health and economic growth.

There is little doubt that the opioid epidemic ravaging our country hinders the 9th Judicial District’s attempts at economic development in our impoverished communities. Pain Pills, heroin, and now fentanyl have touched nearly every member of this community. This epidemic has left no stone unturned in impacting the 9th Judicial District.

It was out of this urgent necessity to address the economic and health devastation of the opioid epidemic and the current lack of available resources to do so that Align9 was founded. The primary purpose of align9 is to align resources for those in this community suffering from the effects of substance abuse disorder, lack of healthcare resources and education, and the economic and legal hurdles resulting from drug and alcohol addiction — bringing together government agencies, non-governmental agencies, and the faith based community.

Align9 develops teams of volunteers to serve as a solution to many of the problems and obstacles hindering both those attempting to overcome opioid addiction and the families and communities struggling to help.

A healthy sustained recovery from substance abuse disorder will allow these citizens and their families an opportunity to not only physically and mentally improve the status of their families and communities, but also economically recover from the poverty which substance use disorder perpetuates.